Alliance Testifies on Home Care Legislation to Committee on Elder Affairs

August 29, 2017

The Massachusetts Legislature’s Joint Committee on Elder Affairs held a public hearing on July 31, 2017. Several of the bills heard are of interest to home care.

The committee heard testimony on bills relating to:

  • Home Care Licensure/Worker Registries:
    • S.364/H. 341 An Act Strengthening the Massachusetts Home Care Program
    • H. 344 An Act Relative to Consumer Protection and Home Care Services
    • H. 1187 An Act relative to home health and hospice aides
    • H. 2068 An Act Establishing a Home Care Aide Training Registry
    • H. 2889 An Act Strengthening Home Care Services
    • S.343 An Act Establishing a Home Care Aide Training Registry
  • Home Care Workforce Bill (Enough Pay to Stay Initiative)

The Home Care Alliance of Massachusetts and some of its members testified on all of the bills, and you can read that testimony at the links below:

If you have any questions, or would like any further information about these legislative proposals, do not hesitate to reach out to Jake Krilovich at jkrilovich@thinkhomecare.org.


Talking Home Care Episode 3: Andrea Cohen on Challenges and Successes for Private Home Care

August 9, 2017
Andrea Cohen

Andrea Cohen

The Talking Home Care podcast returns after a summer hiatus. In this third episode, Pat Kelleher talks with Andrea Cohen, co-founder and CEO of HouseWorks, one of the largest and most successful private care home care agencies in Massachusetts. Topics include:

  • A primer on private care home care (what it is, who it serves, what it offers, is it affordable, etc.);
  • How private care agencies earn their clients’ trust;
  • How technology empowers agencies and families alike;
  • What private care agencies are doing to overcome workforce challenges; and
  • What the future holds for the industry in the post-Baby Boom years.

You may directly download the podcast here (Length: 27’54”; Size: 13 MB).

Talking Home Care LogoHost: Patricia Kelleher, Executive Director of the Home Care Alliance of Massachusetts.

Guest: As the co-founder and CEO of HouseWorks, Andrea Cohen’s vision crystalized over 20 years ago when she took care of both of her parents. HouseWorks’s fundamental innovation has been an entrepreneurial approach to service delivery that returns a sense of control to adult children and their parents.

Don’t want to miss the next episode of Talking Home Care? Subscribe through iTunes, Google Play, or enter the following in your podcast app:

https://thinkhomecare.wordpress.com/category/talking-home-care-podcast/feed/

Links:

  1. Secora Care.  A secure, passive, and private remote-monitoring platform.
  2. The Conversation Project. Talking about elders’ wishes for end-of-life care.
  3. Laurie Orlov’s Tech-Enabled Home Care Report.

Return to www.thinkhomecare.org.


Advocacy Alert: Budget Amendment to Support Home Care Workforce

April 21, 2017

MA-State-HouseWhile demand for home based health and supportive care continues to grow in Massachusetts, the home care industry struggles to recruit and retain essential front line caregivers. New data collected last fall through a survey of home care agencies that contract with the state’s Aging Service Access Points (ASAPs) found that on average 25% of a home care agency’s direct care workforce changes every three months leading to intense instability within the organization.

Please click the link below to write or call your Representatives urging them to sign onto Representative Aaron Vega’s amendment #148 which begins to address the underlying causes for the growing home care worker shortage in Massachusetts and takes steps to assure that their will be workers to meet the demand.

Take Action Here

Massachusetts has been successful at rebalancing the long-term care system, and appropriately diverting consumers from nursing facilities to community care. Between FY12 and FY16, MassHealth has experienced a -5.8% reduction in annual bed days. The movement of care from nursing homes to the community has not been been met with the necessary reinvestments in workforce to ensure the workforce is available to support consumers in need of services. MassHealth has not raised the rate of reimbursement for a home health aide in almost a decade.

Return to www.thinkhomecare.org.


What the Senate’s Economic Development Bill did for Home Care

July 15, 2016

Late Thursday night, the Senate wrapped up debate on more than 200 amendments to legislation promoting economic and workforce development and the Home Care Alliance was active on several issues.

Senate Bill 2423, “An Act relative to job creation, workforce development and infrastructure investment,” created a a special commission to investigate and report on barriers to meeting labor market demands in the commonwealth. The commission’s report can include a broad range of industries, but according to the legislation, it must consist of cyber-security, high technology and biotechnology, early education and care, home care and home health. Despite this focus, the “labor commission,” as it was labeled, did not have a member that represented the home care industry.

Working together with the Home Care Aide Council, and Senator Patricia D. Jehlen’s office, an amendment was adopted to get a home care agency representative on that commission. If the Senate’s legislation advances and is passed, this commission will be shining a light on home care workforce issues on a level of importance that places it with other industries.

The other amendment, which was of great concern, was an effort that would have created a publicly-available registry with the personal information of home care workers. It was the same provision that showed up in legislation and FY17 budget amendments – all of which were defeated.

In this particular iteration, the result was a redrafted amendment to create a registry of home care workers that does NOT include personal information, but rather certifications and whether that worker has ever committed abuse, mistreatment or neglect of an elderly patient or consumer.

The Alliance thanks the many agencies that weighed in quickly with their state senator by phone and email on both of these matters.

The Senate’s legislation now must pass a conference committee process where differences between S.2423 and the House’s version of the bill must be worked out.

Further updates will be shared when they become available.

Return to www.thinkhome.care.


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