Alliance Statement on NAHC President Val Halamandaris’ Passing

July 28, 2017

The Home Care Alliance of Massachusetts is deeply saddened by the passing of Val J. Halamandaris, president of the National Association for Home Care & Hospice (NAHC).

Val dedicated most of his professional life to public service, and transformed the home care industry over the last five decades by fighting for elderly, disabled, and dying Americans. For 20 years, he served as counsel to the Senate and House Committees on Aging before founding NAHC and serving as its president for the last 30 years.

When Val started at NAHC, home care wasn’t what it is today. Institutionalization of the elderly was the standard, and Val sought to change the United States’ policy on this fundamental issue.

“The home care industry suffered an enormous loss this week. Val Halamandaris’ dedication to fighting for Americans’ rights to age in their homes and receive the care that they deserve was unprecedented.We all mourn this loss, but celebrate his 50 years of commitment to our most vulnerable,” said Alliance Board Chair, Holly Chaffee.

Val is survived by his wife, Kathleen, three sons, their wives, six grandchildren, and his brother. A funeral mass will be held for him at 10:00 am on Saturday at St. Peter’s Roman Catholic Church on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Caring Institute.

###


Advocacy Success: Governor Baker Proposes Amendment to Home Care Worker Registry

July 18, 2017

Do you ever wonder if your phone calls into legislator’s offices’ ever do anything? I certainly do. The feeling that you care so deeply about an issue and fight so hard for it, but that the effort isn’t reciprocated by our elected officials.

Or how about when you hear legislators say, “I’m waiting to hear from constituents on this issue.”… Are they really? Do they actually want to hear from us?

When advocates ask me this, I’m always one to say ‘yes, they do want to hear from you.’ But I also understand how people feel when they see common sense solutions seemingly receive no consideration.

Before I go on, I need to disclose that we have to keep fighting for this particular issue. The legislature could reject the Governor’s proposal. But the advocacy behind the recently proposed Home Care Worker Registry should answer all of these questions above and serve as a model.

As you’ve heard numerous times from the Alliance, the Massachusetts Legislature has proposed and included in its final version of the FY18 budget a Home Care Worker Registry. This registry would require agencies to submit its worker’s private information like gender and home address to the Department of Elder Affairs. We have raised numerous legal and privacy implications for this legislation and have fought throughout the budget process to defeat and modify the language.

Last week, we sent out two advocacy action alerts asking you all to send emails into Governor Baker’s office requesting him to amend this registry language and insert an opt-in option for home care workers to chose whether they want this private information disclosed to agencies, ASAP contractors or employer organizations.

In total, Alliance members sent nearly 150 emails to the governor’s office, and yesterday afternoon we found out that the Governor sent back this section to the legislature offering an opt-in amendment. It was one of 9 sections in the over $40 billion budget that he chose to amend. Think about that for a second…

This is a clear accomplishment that proves these emails and phone calls do matter. That working with coalition partners in sync can make a difference.

But remember, we have work to do on this issue, so please keep an eye out for another advocacy alert that will urge the legislature to adopt the Governor’s suggestions and protect our workers!!


Brief Analysis: U.S. Senate’s Better Care Reconciliation Act

June 29, 2017

The United States Senate released its version of a new health care bill on June 22nd. Titled the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA), the bill was met with energized advocacy groups immediately dispelling the measure. Earlier this week Congress’ nonpartisan budget referee, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), estimated that 22 million people would be without insurance by 2026, 1 million less than the House bill which was passed in early May. Facing defeat in a floor vote, with nearly 8 Republican Senators coming out against the bill, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) delayed the vote until after the 4th of July Recess.

Here is a brief analysis of key provisions of the Senate Bill:

  • Medicaid Funding: The bill, like its House counterpart, vastly rolls back Medicaid expansion and phases out federal funding between 2021 and 2023 and further reductions would begin in 2025. The CBO estimates that Medicaid enrollment would fall by more than 15 million people by 2026. Like the House version, this bill would create a block grant mechanism calculated on a per capita basis. Governor Charlie Baker has expressed concern for this and noted that it could cost Massachusetts billions in federal Medicaid funding and leave nearly 264 thousand residents without insurance. The Governor also estimates that the state could face a $8.2 billion shortfall by 2025.
  • Pre-Existing Conditions: Unlike the House bill, insurance companies would be required to accept all applicants regardless of health status. That said, the bill allows states to ask permission to reduce required coverage of essential health benefits. This could result in massive increases for people who want to purchase a plan with essential health benefits. While the CBO estimates that some will see lower premiums, they will also see fewer benefits.
  • Adults Over 50: The Affordable Care Act (ACA) prevented insurers from charging older people more than 3 times what younger enrollees pay. Under the Senate Plan, insurers can charge five times more than younger people and ACA subsidies to help the lower income and elderly pay for insurance would be drastically lower.

What to watch? Since Congress is going through this process under a budget reconciliation rule, the Senate Bill must only have the same amount of savings on the deficit as the House version. Thus, since the Senate version saves over $320 billion over the next 10 years, and the House version saves approximately $100 billion over ten years, the Senate has roughly $200 billion to spend in order to build support with current ‘no’ vote Senators. Keep an eye on states that rely heavily on Medicaid funding, or states heavily impacted by the opioid epidemic. These are some of the Senators currently opposed to the bill, and Leadership may direct additional funding to their states to bring them to a ‘yes’ vote.

For more information or any questions, please contact Jake Krilovich at jkrilovich@thinkhomecare.org


So… You Want to Start a Home Care Agency?

June 26, 2017

What does it take to start a home care agency in Massachusetts? This downloadble brochure — updated for 2017 — covers the basics, including: What regulatory issues pertain; How to get paid; How to bill insurers; Where to get more help; and How the Home Care Alliance of Massachusetts can serve you one you’re up and running.

View this document on Scribd

Return to www.thinkhomecare.org.


2017 Private Care Guides Available

June 12, 2017

Now in its 11th edition, the Guide to Private Home Care Services has connected tens of thousands of families with the home care agencies that best meet their needs. While the Resource Directory is intended for professionals and others who make regular referrals to home care, the Private Care Guides are designed for consumers and are always available at no charge.

Click the images above to order.

The Guides contains county-by-county cross-references, as well as short essays about: What home care is; How to pay for it; How to choose an agency, and; What the advantages are of working with an agency over other options.

Return to www.thinkhomecare.org.


2017 Star Awards, Innovation Showcase Winners Announced!

June 2, 2017

The Home Care Alliance of Massachusetts is pleased to announce its 2017 industry innovators and stars. Awardees will be celebrated during the Innovations Showcase & Star Awards on June 20 at the Granite Links Golf Club, Quincy.

The 2017 honorees include:


Aides of the Year

Gach Clamp, HHA, Emerson Hospital Homecare, Concord

Nancy Quinlan, CNA/HHA, Aberdeen Home Care, Danvers


Clinicians of the Year

David Ahearn, MSW, Baystate Home Health, Springfield

Carlton Jorge, RN, Community Nurse Home Care, Fairhaven


Managers of the Year

Arline McKenzie, Nursing Manager, Walpole Area VNA

Susan Proulx-Galster, Hospice & Palliative Care Program Manager, Circle Home, Lowell


Physician of the Year

David Prybyla, MD, Orthopaedics Surgical Associates, North Chelmsford


Home Care Champion

MA Pediatric Home Nursing Care Campaign


Legislator of the Year

Representative Aaron Vega (D-Holyoke)


Innovation Winners

HouseWorks, Newton:  Instant Hire Event

Southcoast VNA, Fairhaven:  Camp Angel Wings

Brockton VNA:  Lean Process Management


These awards celebrate the exceptional accomplishments of the everyday heroes in our midst who make incredible differences in the lives of their patients/clients and their families. Though there are too few opportunities to recognize all who deserve one, a STAR award brings well-deserved recognition for both the agency and the individuals.

Granite Links

Granite Links Golf Club

Please join us on June 20 as we salute and celebrate the best programs and people in our industry today!

Return to www.thinkhomecare.org.


Advocacy Alert: Budget Amendment to Support Home Care Workforce

April 21, 2017

MA-State-HouseWhile demand for home based health and supportive care continues to grow in Massachusetts, the home care industry struggles to recruit and retain essential front line caregivers. New data collected last fall through a survey of home care agencies that contract with the state’s Aging Service Access Points (ASAPs) found that on average 25% of a home care agency’s direct care workforce changes every three months leading to intense instability within the organization.

Please click the link below to write or call your Representatives urging them to sign onto Representative Aaron Vega’s amendment #148 which begins to address the underlying causes for the growing home care worker shortage in Massachusetts and takes steps to assure that their will be workers to meet the demand.

Take Action Here

Massachusetts has been successful at rebalancing the long-term care system, and appropriately diverting consumers from nursing facilities to community care. Between FY12 and FY16, MassHealth has experienced a -5.8% reduction in annual bed days. The movement of care from nursing homes to the community has not been been met with the necessary reinvestments in workforce to ensure the workforce is available to support consumers in need of services. MassHealth has not raised the rate of reimbursement for a home health aide in almost a decade.

Return to www.thinkhomecare.org.


%d bloggers like this: